Editor's welcome

Editor Sean NolanHello and welcome to this week’s Ireland’s Own. This week we are delighted to present part two of Tom McParland’s continues look at the movie thrillers down through the years that tried to make us squirm.


Paula Redmond tells the story of Michael J. Moran, popularly known as Zozimus, who was an Irish street-rhymer known as the ‘Blind Bard of the Liberties’. Ahead of this year’s Rose of Tralee, Francis Kaye meets two of this year’s contenders who are currently lighting up the corridors of University College Hospital, Galway.


In his Role of the Irish in WW2 series, Con McGrath remembers Fermanagh lady Monica Wichfield, an Irish heroine of the Danish Resistance. Jim Rees looks at the origins of one of the most popular board games in the world, Monopoly and Aileen Atcheson has more tips for keeeping your garden beautiful.

The County Mayo coastal town of Westport celebrates the 250th anniversary of its foundation this year, writes Ray Cleere while Helen Morgan reports on an ever-growing problem of waste left behind by climbers which is threatening havoc in the Himalayas.


The book under review this month is Gentlemen and Players by Joanne Harris while in his Jack Lynch Series Eamonn Duggan charts his rise through the ranks to leader of the country.

We have all this for you to enjoy alongside your weekly favourites including Cassidy, Dan Conway, Pete’s Pets, Stranger Than Fiction and much more. Also, don’t forget to get your entry in for our Short Story Competition 2017. Enjoy the read and I look forward to catching up with you next week. Take care.

Best wishes,

Seán Nolan, Editor, Ireland’s Own

 

Inside this week's issue

0 18
The Mayo town of Westport celebrates the 250th anniversary of its foundation this year, writes RAY CLEERE The coastal town of Westport is situated near...

0 19
Tom McParland continues his look at the movies down through the years that tried to make us squirm. The only time I’ve ever been on...

0 18
Francis Kaye meets two of this year’s Rose of Tralee contenders who are currently lighting up the corridors of University College Hospital, Galway The odds...

0 26
JIM REES looks at the origins of one of the most popular board games in the world We’ve all played it. We’ve all experienced the...

0 65
M.J. Wells takes a light-hearted look at the art of communication - or lack of it - in a marriage. I heard a tale of...

0 60
Jane Austen died on 18 July, 1817. Two hundred years’ later to the day, a new £10 note was launched. The unveiling took place...

Also this week

Sing along with your favourite Irish songs – Master McGrath Eighteen sixty nine being the date anf the year, Those Waterloo sportsmen and more did appear, For to gain the great prizes and bear them awa’, Never counting on Ireland and Master McGrath. On the twelfth of November, that day of renown, McGrath and his keeper they left Lurgan town, A gale in the Channel, it soon drove them o’er, On the thirteenth they landed on England’s fair shore. Oh well when they arrived there in big London Town, Those great English sportsmen all gathered around…

And one of those gentlemen standing nearby said, ‘Is that the great dog you call Master McGrath?’

Lots of great songs for you to sing along with every week in Ireland’s Own

Something for everyone