Editor's welcome

Editor Sean NolanHello and welcome to this week’s Ireland’s Own. This week’s cover story takes us all the way From the Candy Store to the Galtymore. A new book looks at the phenomenon that was the era of the Irish Showband, when at one point it was estimated some 800 bands criss-crossed the country to perform in everything from parochial halls to marquees, supplying the sounds for music hungry audiences, writes Joe Kearney.

Helen Morgan profiles Ninette de Valois, the Blessington woman, who was the founder of the Royal Ballet, while June McDonnell remembers Thomas Heazle Parke, one of the most famous and illustrious Irish surgeons of the day.

Martin Coleman remembers the 18th century Irish poet Seán ‘Clárach’ Mac Domhnaill, and Eleanor Quinlisk tells the story of the legendary sportsman, Irish-Australian Tom Willis, who is credited with being his country’s first cricketer of significance and a founder of ‘Aussie Rules’ football.

In his Role of the Irish in WW2 series, Con McGrath takes a look at the story of Irish-Canadian, John Weir Foote, a recipient of the Victoria Cross during the raid on Dieppe.

John Corbett returns with a selection of memories and stories associated with October in the countryside, and there are more tips and hints from our gardening expert, Aileen Atcheson.

Jim Rees marks the release 90 years ago this month of ‘The Jazz Singer’, the first ‘talkie’ and the film that would change an industry. Eileen Casey writes on the birth of the phenomenon that was ‘Barbie’ the much-loved doll.

The book under review this month is The Dinner by Herman Koch. Eamonn Duggan reports on The 1977 General Election – A Watershed Event in Irish Politics. The Irish general election of 1977 is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century Irish politics as Jack Lynch led Fianna Fáil to a landslide election victory, becoming Taoiseach for the second time, he writes.

We have all this for you to enjoy alongside your weekly favourites. Take care, in the aftermath of the storm, and I look forward to talking to you again next week, all being well.

Best wishes,

Seán Nolan, Editor, Ireland’s Own

 

Inside this week's issue

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Jim Rees marks the release 90 years ago this month of ‘The Jazz Singer’, the first ‘talkie’ and the film that would change an...

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By John Corbett In far back times, when March was the first month and before January and February were added to the calendar, October was...

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A new book looks at the phenomenon that was the era of the Irish Showband, when at one point it was estimated some 800...

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Eleanor Quinlisk outlines the story of the legendary sportsman who is credited with being his country’s first cricketer of significance and a founder of...

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By Helen Morgan The Royal Ballet, one of the leading classical ballet companies in the world today, owes its origins to an Irish woman, Dame...

Also this week

Sing along with your favourite Irish songs – James Connolly A great crowd had gathered out side of Kilmainham, Their heads all uncovered, they knelt to the ground, Inside that grim prison was a brave Irish soldier, His life for his country about to lay down

He went to his death like a true son of Ireland, The firing party, he bravely did face, The order rang out, present arms and fire, James Connolly fell into a ready made grave, The black flag was hoisted, the cruel deed was over

Lots of great songs for you to sing along with every week in Ireland’s Own

Something for everyone